Woolly Wolf Seen in Nepal Raises Questions About Its Family Tree

By analyzing the animal’s DNA, a scientist says the animal is not a subspecies of the gray wolf. Another expert isn’t so sure.

This story has been updated with more details about the genetics of the Himalayan wolf.

Pausing at a clearing, a sudden streak of black against the carpet of white snow moved in the corner of Madhu Chetri’s eye.

It was 2004, and Chetri, now a Ph.D. student at Norway’s Hedmark University College, was trekking through the roof of the world: Nepal’s Annapurna Conservation Area.

Looking up, he caught the gaze of a wolf, who regarded him with curiosity.

“I was struck by these golden yellow eyes. They were so bright. I was so excited,” says Chetri, who was exploring the Upper Mustang region as part of his conservation work. (See ”12 of Our Favorite Wolf Photos.”)

The area had plenty of feral dogs, but Chetri knew right away that this big, woolly creature was no dog.

It was the Himalayan wolf, which had never before been seen in Nepal.

Searching for Scat

Scientists first identified the Himalayan wolf (Canis lupus chanco), thought to be a subspecies of the gray wolf, about 200 years ago.

It was known to live in India and Tibet, but never Nepal.

Not long after Chetri saw his wolf, two studies came out that challenged the idea that the Himalayan wolf was a subspecies. At the DNA level, the studies claimed, the wolf was so different that it deserved its own species name.

Chetri already had a feeling this was the case: The animal he saw was smaller and much leaner than gray wolves, which live in Europe and North America. It also had white patches on its chest and throat, which are not seen in gray wolves.

And he’d always wanted to know more about the beautiful canine that had so captivated him ten years earlier.

So Chetri began to search for its most accessible DNA source: poop. He returned to Nepal and looked for wolf scat when weather was the driest and the feces would be best preserved. (Read about the sky caves of Nepal’s Upper Mustang region.)

Lone Wolf

He managed to collect a total of six samples and could extract DNA from five of them. One of his samples was from a feral dog, leaving him with four specimens.

To be consistent with the two previous studies published in 2004 and 2006, Chetri sequenced the specimens’ mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited from an animal’s mother.

Lähde: Woolly Wolf Seen in Nepal Raises Questions About Its Family Tree

Kategoria(t): Riistanhoito Avainsana(t): , , . Lisää kestolinkki kirjanmerkkeihisi.

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